Fredrick A1, Erickson BA2, Stensland K1, Vanni AJ3.

J Urol. 2017 Mar;197(3 Pt 1):738-743. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.09.083. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

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Abstract

PURPOSE:

Bulbar urethroplasty outcomes studies have shown low but significant rates of post-void dribbling and ejaculatory dysfunction. The bulbospongiosus muscle is involved with the expulsion of seminal fluid and urine from the bulbar urethra and, thus, we hypothesized that performing urethroplasty using a technique that does not split the muscle may result in better postoperative patient reported ejaculatory function and less post-void dribbling.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We performed a multi-institutional matched, case-control analysis comparing men treated with a bulbospongiosus sparing technique to men treated with the traditional nonbulbospongiosus sparing technique. Preoperative and postoperative (3 to 12 months) ejaculatory function was assessed using the 4 ejaculatory questions of the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire short form as well as a patient perception questionnaire. Post-void dribbling was assessed using a validated urethroplasty questionnaire.

RESULTS:

A total of 25 patients who underwent bulbospongiosus sparing urethroplasty and 25 who underwent nonbulbospongiosus sparing urethroplasty were matched by total preoperative Male Sexual Health Questionnaire score, age, and performance of excision and primary anastomosis. The bulbospongiosus sparing and nonbulbospongiosus sparing groups had similar postoperative total Male Sexual Health Questionnaire scores (15.24 vs 15.40, respectively, p=0.90) and there were no significant postoperative questionnaire score changes in either group (bulbospongiosus sparing 14.56 to 15.24, p=0.4; nonbulbospongiosus sparing 14.64 vs 15.40, p=0.44). Individual responses to the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire were analyzed and no statistically significant difference was found between the groups. Rates of postoperative post-void dribbling and perception of ejaculatory function were similar between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sparing the bulbospongiosus muscle during urethroplasty does not seem to have a significant impact on patient reported ejaculatory function or post-void dribbling compared with nonbulbospongiosus sparing urethroplasty at early followup.