Osterberg EC, Vanni AJ, Gaither TW, Awad MA, Broghammer JA, Pate SC, Wyre H, Myers JB, Elliott SP, Krishna S, Zhao LC, McClung C, Erickson BA, Breyer BN.

World J Urol. 2016 Dec 7.

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Abstract

PURPOSE:

To characterize anterior urinary fistula following radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

METHODS:

Over 10 years, 31 men were identified to have an anterior urinary fistula. A retrospective database was created to evaluate patient demographics, presentation, diagnostic procedures, operative interventions, outcomes, and complications. Comparisons between men who underwent cystectomy versus bladder-sparing surgeries were performed.

RESULTS:

At a median age of 73 (interquartile range (IQR) 68.5, 79) years, presenting symptoms included as follows: pubic pain (19/31, 61%), urine drainage via fistula (10/31, 32%), or a superficial wound infection (6/31, 19%). Recent instrumentation prior to diagnosis of anterior urinary fistula was reported by 18/31 (58%) at a median of 14.9 months (IQR 7.9, 103.8) after manipulation. Anterior fistula formation was either isolated to the pubic symphysis (19/31, 61%) or the thigh (12/31, 38%). Nineteen men underwent a cystectomy, whereas 12 men underwent a fistula repair. Excluding grades 1 and 2, 30- and 90-day postoperative complications were limited to four and two men, respectively, all of whom had a grade 3 complication. At 6-month follow-up, 26/31 (84%) men reported their pain had resolved. There was one fistula recurrence managed with subsequent cystectomy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Complex anterior urinary fistula to the pubic symphysis and thigh are devastating yet treatable conditions. Universally, these men have a history of radiotherapy and repeated endoscopic interventions. Surgical intervention with either cystectomy or primary repair was highly successful.

KEYWORDS:

Bladder neck contracture; Complication; Radiation; Radiotherapy; Urinary fistula